Page 1
Standard

An infographic for the keyboard-obsessed

The web site Go Mechanical Keyboard just released the results of their semi-annual keyboard survey in the form of a very nice infographic, which I’ve displayed below. You can view the raw data online if you want. 950 people responded from 49 different countries.

You need to be a bit obsessed with keyboards to understand everything in the infographic, although if you’ve been following my other posts on keyboards you should get most of it. Form factor? See my post “How many keys are there on a keyboard?“. Switch types? See my recent post “A keyboard with swappable switches” where I change the switches that came with the keyboard.

What do you think about the infographic?

winter-survey-final2

The end
Standard

A keyboard with swappable switches

It started out with a post to Reddit that linked to a series of photos on Imgur of a new keyboard the user had ordered from the Chinese e-commerce site Taobao. Taobao, for those who don’t know, is a Chinese-language-only e-commerce site run by Alibaba Group that caters to residents of China and nearby countries where people speak Chinese. Many sellers on the site, even if you could navigate the site in Chinese, won’t ship outside of China. To meet demand, a whole crop of sites have sprung up just to help foreigners order products from Taobao. These ‘Taobao agents’ will order the product for you, receive the product in China, and then re-ship it to you wherever you are in the world. Of course, that service comes with a price, and in many cases that eliminates any cost savings you might get from ordering from Taobao. Occassionally, however, there are products on Taobao that are not available elsewhere. In this case, the user (redditsavedmyagain) ordered a keyboard that was in fact quite unique.

The keyboard is called the Team Wolf Zhuque+. I had never heard of it and before that post on Reddit most other people had never heard of it either. The keyboard was made of Aluminum, had folding feet on the bottom that could be used to angle the keyboard, and had LED backlights. Most interestingly, the keyboard was configured to allow switches to added without soldering (and removed without desoldering). The keyboard comes with blue Gaote Outemu switches, made special for the SMD LED underneath the switch. Most LEDs in keyboards go on the top of the switch, with the wires going through holes in the switch and then soldered to the circuit board underneath. Since this keyboard allows the switches to be removed, the LEDs are surface-mounted to the circuit board and have no connection to the switch. This is nice, but presents some problems. For one, the light is below the switch instead of on top of it, meaning the switch itself needs to either be transparent or have a hole to allow the light through. Also, since most switches are not designed with SMD LEDs in mind, they may not have enough room at the bottom for the LED. The Gaote switches used in this keyboard are specially designed for these kinds of LEDs, and are recessed at the bottom to leave room for the LED, have an extra large hole to allow light through, and while the bottom of the switch is white plastic, the top is transparent. This allows the light lots of room to shine.

Two things about the keyboard got users excited on Reddit. First, the swappable switches. It’s not the first keyboard to have swappable switches, but it definitely is one of the first. The second reason was the price. The keyboard cost only about $30-$40. That’s more or less unheard of for a metal-frame mechanical keyboard, especially one including Cherry MX-compatible switches. While lots of people on Reddit wanted to order the keyboard, they ran into a problem – there was no easy way to order it without speaking Chinese and probably having a shipping location in China. Some managed to do it, but most could not. Instead, something interesting happened. Users recruited representatives of Massdrop on Reddit to look into putting together a group buy on their site. That came together very quickly. Massdrop contacted the manufacturer, and offered two versions of the keyboard, the same TKL version shown on Reddit, and a Full Size keyboard as well (if you don’t know the difference between TKL and Full Size, see my article How many keys are there on a keyboard?). In addition to the keyboard, Massdrop allowed the user to bundle Gateron switches that were similarly configured to the Gaote switches, designed for use with SMD LEDs. The Gateron switches similarly had a gap for the LED, larger holes above the LED, and transparent tops. Massdrop offered the switches in a variety of types (brown, red, black, etc.) for $30 for a set. The price of the TKL keyboard was $59 (and an extra $20 for the Full Size) and while shipping in the US wasn’t too expensive, outside the US the shipping came to $30. That brought the price of the keyboard that was somewhere around $30-$40 on Taobao to $89 to people outside the US. A lot of people were annoyed at the big price hike. Of course, most people couldn’t order on Taobao, and certainly couldn’t get SMD LED compatible switches to go with the keyboard (specialist switches like this are incredibly hard to find in small volumes).

Another option popped up at the same time. Chinese site Banggood.com also followed the post, and offered the same TKL version from the original post for $59 on their site, including shipping anywhere in the world. While the Massdrop deal might be better in the US considering it could be bundles with extra switches and you could get the Full Size version, the Banggood deal was better for most people outside the US as the price was the same and the shipping was free.

One big difference between Massdrop and Banggood in terms of this keybaord, is that Massdrop sold a set amount, and now you need to wait until Massdrop decides there’s enough interest to have another group buy for the keyboard. Banggood is a normal e-commerce site, and you can still buy the keyboard from them for $59. As long as there is interest in it, presumably they’re continue to replenish stock.

So I bought a keyboard through BG. It’s true that I can’t find the special SMD LED switches myself, but I read that other switches could work. I happened to have a bag of normal Gateron switches, and figured I could make them work. If not, I could always use the keyboard with the Gaote switches it came with.

This is what the keyboard looked like on arrival:

Close up of Team Wolf keyboard with original keycaps

For more (and better) images see the original photos on Imgur linked to from Reddit, as well as another review on Imgur (I can’t find the post that linked to this review).

So a few things about the stock appearance. Note the white keycaps with translucent legends. The stencil-like appearance of the legends is, how do I put this, not very appealing. I I like the FN (function) key that lets me use all the secondary functions, such as the media keys and the backlight controls.

The keyboard comes with a keycap remover, and a switch remover. The keycap remove wasn’t particularly good, but I had a different one which made it easier to remove all the keycaps:

Team Wolf keyboard close-up with keycaps removed

The switches are blue tactile clicky Gaote Outemu switches. Note the bottom half is white plastic, and the top is transparent. The first thing I noticed when I removed the keycaps was that the switches are mounted upside down. It took me a few moments before I realized all the keycaps I had removed had their legends on the top half of the keycap. The switches were mounted upside down so the opening for the LED underneath the switch would be underneath the legends. Normally the LEDs that are mounted on top of a switch are on the lower half of the switch, so in order to have the light on the top half of the keycap they needed to be upside down.

The next step was removing the switches from the keyboard. In a normal mechanical keyboard, you would need to desolder the switches from the circuit board, and then remove the switches. A normal switch has two contacts that would have to be desoldered. If there were LEDs, depending on the type, you would need to desolder either two or four contacts. That’s per switch. These LEDs have two contacts, so four contacts per switch, times 87 keys, is 348 contacts to desolder to replace all the switches in a normal mechanical keyboard of this size. I’m okay with soldering, but let me say that I hate desoldering. That’s one of the reasons this keyboard appealed to me. Here’s the switch removal tool that comes with the keyboard. It takes all of a couple of seconds to remove the switches:

Removing a switch

Removing the switches leaves you with an empty space in the top plate over the circuit board. Below you can see the four arrow key switches removed, with one of them flipped over so you can see the bottom of the switch. Note the two contacts, and the receiving point in the circuit board those would go into. You can also see the LED mounted on the circuit board, and the big hole in the switch which goes over that LED. The big circle in the middle of the switch is there to help hodl the switch in place, and you can see the corresponding hole in the circuit board where that goes.

Switches removed with one upside down

A look at the keyboard with all the switches removed. You might notice that the LEDs for some key locations are different than others. That’s because the LEDs are different colors. The letters and the right-side keys all have blue backlighting. The modifier and function keys all have white backgrounds, while the number keys have green backgrounds. The stabilizers, the white plastic pieces on either side of the large key locations (Backspace, Return and Shift) are not a type of stabilizer that I had ever seen before, but luckily they worked just fine with the other set of keycaps I wanted to use.

Team Wolf keyboard with switches removed

Before putting in new switches, I wanted to see what was on the back of the circuit board. I removed all the screws and removed the top plate and circuit board, and then flipped it over. You can clearly see the black units that receive the switch contacts:

Bottom of Team Wolf circuit board showing switch receivers

Here you can see the side of the circuit board that sits underneath the right side of the keyboard, where everything that makes the keyboard tick is placed:

Bottom of Team Wolf circuit board showing resistors

Once I took a look I put everything back together, and put all the screws back. The next step was preparing the switches. I didn’t have the special SMD LED switches, only plain Gateron brown switches. The switches I had were actually made for use directly on a PCB, so they had two extra small posts coming out of the bottom of the switch that would normally fit into matching holes in the PCB. Since I was plate-mounting these switches, and the PCB didn’t have matching holes, I had to do a little switch circumcision and snip the two posts off each switch:

Switch circumcision

The next step was to deal withy the fact that these switches were not designed to be used with SMD LEDs. The goal of those switches is to allow more light through the switch, both by having a larger hole above the LED and by having transparent switch tops. Standard Gateron switches like the ones I had are slightly translucent white plastic, but not fully transparent. Luckily I had a bag of transparent switch tops, and just needed to swap out the tops of each switch. For that purpose I have a 3D-printed switch opener that does the trick nicely:

Switch opener

It’s a little hard to tell from the picture, but basically you lower the switch on to the black plastic opener, and small wedges in the opener pry open four connection points on the switch and allow the top to be pulled up from the switch. After swapping the switch cover you can see the difference in the switch appearance:

Switch cover comparison

I also considered making a larger hole in the bottom of the switch to try to match somewhat with the switches that came with the keyboard, but I figured it didn’t matter too much since the Gateron bottoms were somewhat translucent, and the light would shine through the whole switch.

Here’s a look at the bottoms of the two switches. On the left is the Gaote switch that came with the keyboard. Note the opaque white plastic, and the large hole for the LED. It’s a little hard to see but the hole sits above a small gap that allows more room for the LED. The Gateron on the right, however, is made of translucent plastic, and has very small holes for the LED (because for these switches the LED would normally be on top, and the two contacts from the LED would pass through those tiny holes).

Bottom of Gaote and Gateron switches

One other minor modification was for the switch to be used for the space bar. It’s normal for the space bar to have a stronger spring than the other keys. I started out with a clear Gateron switch, and removed the cover, spring, and plunger from the switch. I then inserted the gold spring shown with a much higher resistance, and reinserted the plunger and added a transparent cover. I knew the space bar I was going to use didn’t have any opening for light, so putting the transparent cover on it was sort of a waste, but I figured I might as well keep it consistent.

Replacing the switch spring

This is what the switches looked like in place:

Team Wolf keyboard with brown Gateron switches close-up

They look pretty good, it’s almost a shame to cover them up with keycaps. Note that I had no trouble inserting these switches into the keyboard, event though the switches were not designed to work with SMD LEDs. It’s possible I’ll run into problems at some point because the switches are resting directly on the LEDs, although LEDs don’t generate a lot of heat, so it really should be too much of a problem.

I tested out the backlights before adding the keycaps, just to make sure they were all working:

Testing the backlights

Now that I knew all the switches were working I needed to add the keycaps. Before I could do that, however, I needed to get the stabilizers installed. Stabilizers are used by keys that are at least twice the width of a standard key. At that point the key can have problems without a stabilizer to keep the pressing of the key consistent. You don’t want there to be a problem when pressing the side of the key where the key just bends instead of pressing down the plunger on the switch. As I mentioned, I had never seen these kinds of stabilizers before, but they seemed fairly simple.

You start by removing the little plastic inserts from the old keys. Most keys have two stabilizers. Note the metal wire on either side of the stabilizer in the keyboard. You lift up the wire which is actually one U shaped wire, and position the plastic inserts onto those wires. The inserts fall into the stabilizer spaces, and when you push the keycap down all three plus-shaped pieces get pushed into the keycap (the two stabilizers and the switch itself in the middle):

Team Wolf keyboard stabs

After getting all the stabilized keys installed, started adding all the other keycaps:

Team Wolf keyboard half keycaps

These keycaps are Vortex Double-Shot PBT/POM keycaps. The black material is PBT, a higher-quality plastic than the standard ABS plastic used in most keycaps. The legends are injection-molded separately (the double-shot) out of POM, which is translucent.

Team Wolf keycaps with PBT keycaps

You can see that the legends are not the most readable. Here’s what they look like when the keyboard is plugged in:

Backlight test corner

Backlight test middle

Since these keycaps were not designed for this keyboard, the backlighting isn’t perfect. The biggest problem is that for numbers, the backlight is lighting up the shift value for each key instead of the primary value. Note how the !, @, #, etc. are all green while the numbers are not lit up at all. Here’s the full view:

Final keyboard Team Wolf

While not perfect, I’m definitely enjoying the Gateron brown switches, and I like the appearance of the Vortex PBT keycaps over the keycaps that came with the keyboard. The lack of backlight under the numbers is a bit distracting, however. It’s the same with any keycap that has two symbols on it, like the comma and period keys. You can understand now why the keycaps that came with the keyboard made the unusual design decision to put multiple symbols next to each other at the top, instead of the more standard one on top of the other. While I worked hard to maintain the backlighting, in the end it’s possible I’ll switch to regular keycaps that don’t support backlighting, to get a more consistent look for the keyboard. Maybe I’ll just switch the alphanumeric keys to standard keycaps, and leave everything else backlit. I’ll have to see if I can find keycaps that match the appearance of these Vortex keycaps, which may not be easy since these are PBT and any other keycaps I have, and most made, are ABS. One thing that bother me about the keyboard is the placement of the cable right in the middle of the case. I would have preferred to have it off to one side since I mostly work with a laptop and the cable gets in the way. A nice feature would have been to offer more than one exit point for the cable, and let the user decide which one to use.

I’m kind of amazed how much interest was generated for this keyboard by a single post in a forum. I hope Team Wolf is at least sending redditsavedmyagain some swag.

The end
Standard

Time for some Pi

The Raspberry Pi is a single-board credit-card-sized computer introduced in 2012. The computer was designed for use in teaching computer science to a new generation whose cell phones and modern computers had reduced the number of children who knew how computers actually worked. Used in education as well as by hobbyists, the Raspberry Pi has been incredibly successful and has sold over four million units. New versions of the Raspberry Pi are designed by the non-profit Raspberry Pi Foundation, and then built by multiple partner manufacturers.

The Raspberry Pi 2 Model B
The Raspberry Pi 2 Model B

This week the Raspberry Pi Foundation announced the availability of their second-generation board, the Raspberry Pi 2 Model B. It’s not the second board (there has been the Model A, Model A+, Model B, and Model B+ before, as well as the Pi Compute Module for embedded applications), but rather it is the first board since introduction to use a new processor, the Broadcom BCM2836. The new processor is roughly six times as fast as the previous processor, going from a single-core ARM11 to a quad-core ARM Cortex-A7 processor, as well doubling the RAM to 1GB (shared with the GPU). Despite those changes, the board remains backwards-compatible with previous Raspberry Pi software, the hardware is pin-compatible with the previous Model B+ board, and the cost is still $35.

The significance of this new generation of Raspberry Pi can be illustrated by the fact that Microsoft has announced that they will be giving away copies of Windows 10 that run on the Raspberry Pi 2 to anyone who signs up to it’s Internet of Things developer program. Think about that for a second – a $35 computer running Windows (ok, strictly speaking that’s not true – you still need a power supply, keyboard, mouse, and monitor).

Perhaps the most important change, besides the extra power, is that the new chip moves from the older ARMv6 instruction set to the newer ARMv7 set. That change will allow a lot of software the previously could not run on the Raspberry Pi to now be ported. This includes other operating systems, such as the previous mentioned Windows 10, and Snappy Ubuntu Core, a version of the popular Linux distribution Ubuntu geared for devices (and the cloud). Other operating systems that already supported the older Raspberry Pi are also being updated for the new chip, such as Raspbian (a version of Debian Linux for the Raspberry Pi), and the media-focused OpenELEC and OSMC.

In addition to introducing the new product, the Raspberry Pi Foundation has made another change recently – they’ve hired their first US employee. In January they added Matt Richardson, based in San Francisco, to their staff as an evangelist. While it’s certain that a large chunk of the 4 million plus boards sold already were sold to people in the US, as the goal of Raspberry Pi is to encourage computer science education among children, Richardson will no doubt be pushing to get the Raspberry Pi used in schools across the country, like they are in the UK where the Raspberry Pi originated.

While there are other small single-board computers out there (such as the BeagleBone Black), one of the great things about the Raspberry Pi is the large number of makers and other enthusiasts that have created products that supplement the Raspberry Pi. Take, for example, that there are over 150 Kickstarter campaigns that are related to the Raspberry Pi. One of my favorite campaigns was the Kano computer, a kit that allows you to assemble a computer using a Raspberry Pi Model B as its core, adding WiFi support, a speaker, a plastic case, and a wireless keyboard. Beside the hardware additions, the Kano also comes with its own operating system which is geared towards teaching children how to program, and a community for sharing software projects and code.

The Kano Computer Kit
The Kano Computer Kit

I got to play with a Kano at a tech event in Tel Aviv last year, a bit before the launch last fall. While it was tempting to pre-order one to teach my oldest child to code, she was 6 at the time, so I figured it was worth waiting a bit. My plan is to try teaching her next year when she’s 8, and by then I imagine the Kano kit will be upgraded to include the new Pi 2 board.

It’s great to see innovation and success with products like the Raspberry Pi, that create opportunities for computer education that are available to anyone. It’s great to see a computer available for $35 that has more power than most computers I used in my lifetime. I hope the Raspberry Pi, and the ecosystem built around it, continues to be successful and grow.

The end